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Saturday, 14 February 2015

Flute

The oldest musical instruments ever found are flutes that inhabitants of southern Germany laboriously carved from bird bone and mammoth ivory at least 42,000 years ago.

The oldest playable musical instrument in the world is a flute carved from a bird’s wing bone made more than 9,000 years ago. It was discovered with other flutes at an ancient burial site in China.

Flutes of some sort were known to primitive peoples, to the ancient civilizations of Egypt and Greece, and to virtually all earlier societies throughout the world.

The earliest written reference to a flute is from a Sumerian-language cuneiform tablet dated to c. 2600–2700 BC.

Wandering minstrels played the flute as early as the 13th century in Europe.

From the 16th through the 19th century, the number of holes in the flute increased, and their placement changed. These alterations resulted in an instrument capable of a wider range, more precise tuning, purer sound, and greater agility.

The modern flute, which replaced the earlier instruments in general use, was developed in the early 19th century by the German instrument maker Theobald Boehm. Boehm devised numerous improvements, evolving the size and placement of tone holes, the key mechanism, and the fingering system used to produce the notes in the flute's range. These refinements gave the modern flute a greater volume and richness of tone and an even greater agility.

Many salutes players suffer from 'flautist's chin,' a medical complaint caused by dribbling which leads to a fungal infection on the lower face.

Because the flute doesn’t have any reeds, it usually requires more air than any other wind instrument.

Here is a list of pop songs featuring flutes

Source Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia © 1998 The Learning Company, Inc.

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