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Saturday, 18 July 2015

Sherlock Holmes

A Study in Scarlet was a full length detective novel by British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Published in 1887, the story marks the first appearance of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, who would become among the most famous characters in literature.

A Study in Scarlet was the first work of fiction to mention a magnifying glass being used as an investigative tool and is the reason we still connect this item with detectives today

Strand Magazine published the first of their 56 Sherlock Holmes short stories, A Scandal In Bohemia, on June 25, 1891.

Illustration of the short story A Scandal in Bohemia, which appeared in The Strand Magazine 

Arthur Conan Doyle modeled Sherlock Holmes after a professor at the University of Edinburgh - Dr. Bell who could diagnose a patient's problems almost purely by looking at him or her.

Conan Doyle chose the name Sherlock in honor of Nottingham cricketers Mordecai Sherwin and Frank Shacklock. Originally it was Sherringford Holmes.

The first name of Holmes' colleague, Dr Watson, is John but his wife calls him James in The Man With the Twisted Lip.

Holmes often said "elementary" and "My dear Watson" but never "Elementary my dear Watson."

Sherlock Holmes and his nemesis Professor Moriarty supposedly fell to their deaths from the Reichenbach Falls in Switzerland on May 4, 1891. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle had decided to kill off Holmes in a short story, The Final Problem, so he could get on with more serious writing. He'd decided the Reichenbach Falls was the exit he wanted for his fictional detective after seeing them during a holiday with his wife in Switzerland. Doyle later relented.

Holmes and Moriarty struggle at the Reichenbach Falls; drawing by Sidney Paget

Sherlock Holmes Baffled was the first film to feature Conan Doyle's fictional detective. It was a 30-second silent spoof released in the US on April 25, 1900.


Sherlock Holmes has been depicted on screen over 255 times, a world record for the most portrayed literary human character in film and TV.

NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is a huge Sherlock Holmes fan and co-wrote a novel about Sherlock Holmes's brother, Mycroft.

The Sherlock Holmes Museum, officially at 221b Baker Street, London, is actually at number 239.

Source Daily Express

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