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Tuesday, 16 August 2016

NASCAR

NASCAR is an acronym which stands for "National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing." It is the governing body of stock car racing in the United States.

NASCAR was founded on February 21, 1948 by Bill France Sr. and several other race car drivers. Originally there were three divisions. Modifieds, Roadsters and Strictly Stock.


The first race in the "strictly stock" division was held on June 19, 1949 at a three-quarter mile dirt track called Charlotte Speedway. Jim Roper won that very first race. This division grew to become the Sprint Cup series.

In May 1987 NASCAR driver Bobby Allison was involved in an accident at the Talladega Superspeedway. The impact, at over 200 miles per hour (320 km/h), tore out over 100 yards of fencing. Parts and pieces of the car went flying into the grandstand injuring several spectators. This lead NASCAR to develop restrictor plate racing the following season at Daytona and Talladega to keep speeds under 200 miles per hour (320 km/h).

When Ricky Craven won the Darlington 500 on March 16, 2003, he beat Kurt Busch by .002 seconds, the closest finish in NASCAR history.


The biggest Sprint Cup race of the year is the Daytona 500 which is the very first race of the year.

Danica Patrick's eighth place in the 2013 Daytona 500 was the first top-10 finish achieved by a woman in the Daytona 500.

The start of the 2015 Daytona 500

The NASCAR Sprint Cup series features 36 races on 22 different race tracks. 34 of those races feature all left turns on ovals or D shaped race tracks. Two races are held on road courses.

The tracks vary in size from the massive 2.66 mile Talladega Superspeedway down to the tiny .526 mile Martinsville Speedway.

You don't need a driver's license to be a NASCAR driver.

Source About.com

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