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Wednesday, 29 October 2014

Door

The ancient Greeks developed several ways of allowing a door to be unlocked from the outside as well as from the inside. One improvement consisted of a rope attached to a pivoted bar and passed through a hole in the door. A tug on the rope lifted the bar from its cleats.


The saying “when one door closes, another opens" is an Alexander Graham Bell quote which he then followed by saying "but we so often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door, that we do not see the ones which open for us.”

The world’s first revolving door was the Van Kannel Revolving Storm Door, patented on August 7, 1888 by Theophilus van Kannel of Philadelphia. Van Kannel came up with idea for revolving doors because he hated opening doors for women. The patent drawing by Theophilus Van Kannel below was for a "Storm-Door Structure."

Theophilus Van Kannel's patent drawing for a revolving door, 1888

A total of 60 doors were destroyed by Jack Nicholson for his iconic "Here's Johnny!" scene in The Shining.

When the studio behind Star Trek received a letter from a builder asking how to make automatic sliding doors that opened and closed as fast as on the Enterprise, the reply explained that the doors were manually operated by an offstage crewman. If too late, cast would hit unopened doors.

The Foley sound effect for automatic doors in Star Wars was created by sliding a piece of paper out of an envelope.

At 456 feet high, the world's largest door is taller than the Statue of Liberty and owned by NASA.

Cellar door has been cited as the most beautiful phrase in the English language based purely in terms of its sound.


Vancouver banned doorknobs, even in private homes, in favor of levers, which are easier for the elderly and disabled to maneuver.

Poorly designed doors (doors that aren't obvious if you push, pull, turn a handle, etc to open) are called "Norman Doors" and are named after Don Norman who writes about how it should be obvious as to how everyday items function.

Source Compton's Interactive Encyclopedia

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