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Friday, 15 May 2015

Guinness

Irishman Arthur Guinness signed a 9,000-year lease on December 31, 1759 at a fixed rate of £45 per annum to the St. James's Gate Brewery in Dublin. He began brewing there a variety of light and dark beers.

Arthur Guinness had 21 children with just one wife.

A London brewer called Harwood was brewing in the 1790s porter, a dark beer with a rich head, which is brewed with soft rather than hard water. The drink acquired its name from the fact that it was especially popular among porters. In 1799 Arthur Guinness decided to concentrate exclusively on stout-porter, (sometimes shortened to stout), which is a stronger version of porter.

Guinness' distinctive, dark, creamy stout proved popular and in time became known as the national beer of Ireland.

The Guinness company began publishing the Guinness Book of Records in 1955, to help settle trivia disputes in pubs.

In 1982 Guinness came close to re-launching the brand as an English beer brewed in west London.

In 2015, Guinness announced that it was changing its 256-year-old recipe by removing a substance that originates from fish bladders, called isinglass, in its brewing filters so the drink could become vegan friendly. Isinglass helps drinks settle faster.

Guinness officially says their beer isn’t black, it’s a, “dark ruby red.”

It was a tradition in Ireland that if you donated a pint of blood, they'd give you a pint of Guinness to replace the iron.

According to Guinness, the head of a professionally poured pint of the stout will measure 13mm and contain more than 300 million micro-bubbles.


162,719 pints of Guinness Beer are wasted each year by ending up in your mustache, not your stomach.

Guinness was the favorite drink of Hollywood legend Gregory Peck, which he had every day, even having a tap installed in his home.

Worldwide, 13 million pints of Guinness are consumed each St. Patrick's Day.

More Guinness is drunk in Nigeria than in Ireland.

Guinness actually has fewer calories than Budweiser and almost every other non-light beer.

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