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Sunday, 4 January 2015

Emergency Service

Before "SOS" became a distress signal, “CQD" was used by telegraphers and wireless operators to address all stations at once in emergencies.

Mayday is an international distress call used by ships and aircraft in radio communications. The Mayday procedure word was originated in 1923 by Frederick Stanley Mockford (1897–March 1, 1962), who was a senior radio officer at Croydon Airport in London. When asked to think of a word that could be used internationally to indicate distress and be easily understood by in an emergency, Mockford proposed "Mayday" an alliteration of the French "m’aider" in versez m’aider ("come and help me").

The emergency 999 phone service, the first of its kind in the world, was introduced to Britain on June 30, 1937.  It followed a two-year inquiry into the deaths of five women in a London fire in 1935. Tory MP Sir Sidney Herbert had suggested a special emergency button on the handset instead, saying: "How can a lady with a burglar in the house remember to dial 999?"

At first the buzzer which alerted switchboard operators to a 999 emergency call was so loud that a number of girl operators fainted when they heard it. This problem was resolved by inserting a tennis ball in the mouth of the buzzer, which succeeded in reducing the noise to a more tolerable level.

The first 911 emergency telephone system in the US. went operational in Haleyville, Alabama on February 16, 1968.


The first-ever 9-1-1 call was placed by Alabama Speaker of the House Rankin Fite, from Haleyville City Hall, to U.S. Rep. Tom Bevill, at the city's police station.

In 1968, 9-1-1 became the national emergency number for the United States. The number itself, however, did not become widely known until the 1970s, and many municipalities did not have 9-1-1 service until well into the 1980s.

A 2-year-old girl in South Carolina called 911, asking for help getting dressed. Deputy Martha Lohnes showed up and pulled up her pants.

Contrary to the urban myth, dialing 999 does not charge mobile phone batteries.

Source Daily Mail

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